Holiday Inn–never okay!

Posted on December 23, 2008. Filed under: Civil Rights, What History is For | Tags: , , , , |

The New York Times has been running an end-of-year appreciation of classic holiday movies. Today, A. O. Scott actually appreciated the Bing Crosby movie “Holiday Inn.”

I have already expressed my view of this movie in this blog. Its (horribly) extended blackface song sequence, with whites singing in “Negro dialect” about “Fadder Abraham” is unconscionable, sickening, and impossible to excuse or rationalize. A. O. Scott does both.

The problem with this terrible racist scene, for Scott, is that it  “dates” the film “somewhat”, and makes it “unpalatable” for “current sensibilities.” But “it’s important to remember that this movie is more than 65 years old.” Problem solved! My current sensibility is satisfied now.

Racism is never excusable because there was simply never a time in history when people did not know racism was used to hurt and oppress others. And frankly, to excuse a movie playing when people I know were alive for being from some ancient, distant time (65 years ago) is beyond lame. There is no place for accepting and softening crap like this in the United States of America at any time, but perhaps especially now.

So this “pure, confectionary diversion” may work for you if you’re not black and you don’t have a current sensibility; otherwise, skip it.

Make a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

3 Responses to “Holiday Inn–never okay!”

RSS Feed for The Historic Present Comments RSS Feed

Problem: It’s a great movie, highly entertaining and you have a simplistic, knee-jerk, revisionist and myopic judgment of what is depicted in it.

I will watch it over and over and over and over again and so will millions of others. It is a classic.

You know where to find me.

Like

Find you? We only thank you for writing, as we do for everyone who writes in.

Like

I grew up watching the film and the racial stereotypes are front and center in this film. Now on tv they omit then the blackface scene. But the actress eludes to the blackface making her ugly before the omitted scene. They did their best but there is only so much they can do. Still a classic but watch with a disclaimer.

Like


Where's The Comment Form?

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: